Bible Covers for Women

Bible covers for women make the perfect Christmas or birthday gift. They are great for keeping your bible in great shape for many years. A Bible is perhaps the most important possession that most of us will ever have, so you want to protect it with a beautiful cover. There are literally thousands of bible covers for women that are stylish and can fit all sizes of Bibles. Most covers come with a handle so that you can carry it by the handle! There are several features of a great cover for your Bible that you’ll want to take into consideration when purchasing the Word of God.

Pockets
When you are looking at cover you want to purchase, you should look to see if it has several pockets where you can store pens, church bulletins, and notes from the last sermon. If you are like many people, you may store bulletins from the last six months in your cover! If the Bible has multiple pockets, this would allow you to keep small pens and small items in one pocket, and notes and other papers in another pocket. Some of the pockets will have zippers so you don’t have to worry about things falling out of your Bible. I have had items fall out of the pocket when I didn’t have a zipper on the pocket, so it is nice to have zippers for the pockets on the outside of the cover. Some of the covers today will even come with cell phone pockets.

Material
You can get Bible covers for women that are made of many different materials today. Generally speaking, leather covers will hold up longer than other materials. You can get covers in leather material, microfiber, durable nylon, khaki, and many other materials.

Color
If you want a fashionable cover, you can get covers in almost any color. The trendy lux leather purple cover is one of the most popular covers among women today. It comes with Hebrews 11:1 printed on the front of the cover. Some women love black, so leather black covers are always popular with women. Women’s bible covers tend to come in a wide variety of colors, so if color is important, you can find any color you want. You can also purchase covers that come in multiple colors, camouflage colors, or even zebra colors!

There are many other features to consider as you search for the right cover that will fit your needs. Many of the covers you can purchase for women are designed to make the Bible look like a purse. These are stylish and fashionable for many women. Make sure to purchase your Bible covers for women at a reputable site that specializes in the sale of Christian products, as these sites often have the best and largest selection of products.

Saving the Family Bible

The Family Bible is typically 12 x10 by 4 inches. The Bible was most likely published between 1840 and 1900. In the beginning of this Family Bible period the covers were flat with little embossment if any. Later Family Bibles from 1870 are most often deeply embossed and have panels stamped in gold. More often than not the later Bibles’ paper can be more embrittled than earlier Bibles. Paper was mass-produced with more harsh chemicals after the beginning of the industrial revolution. Earlier Bibles tend to be single columned content where newer ones of the late Victorian will be double columned. These later Bibles often have glossaries, maps and illustrated sections in the front of the Bible.

Why is this family relic in poor condition? Family Bibles like everything else suffer the passage of time, but the biggest threats to the Bible are heat, humidity and light. That is not to say that some of these venerable giants have simply been worn-out by use. There are usually many forensic signs of heavy usage such as, food and debris in the gutters, ear-marked pages from heavy use, hair braids to corsages stuffed between pages, torn and bumped covers and finally the general rubs and abrasions of prolonged use. But suffering all this, again a Bible’s great enemies are heat, humidity and light.

The effects of these three conditions do more to age and breakdown the substance of Bibles than anything else. From what materials are a Bible made? First, the papers in earlier Bibles are a cotton, linen or a mix of the two. These fibers are very long lived and as an example a pure linen paper can easily last over 500 years. Later, the pages were pulped using tree fibers and harsh chemicals. That’s why I said older paper is likely to be in better condition because of the quality of materials. Older Bibles may have one or two different papers, typically one kind for illustrations and the other for text. Later Bibles have a change of papers like a model in a fashion show. For example the illustrations, the title page and interleafing tissue, the text paper, the Family Record pages, more text paper and at the back heavy paper lined board where photographs are inserted.

Family Bibles are made with leather. Again owing to radical changes in the production techniques, earlier Bibles tend to have longer lasting leather and newer ones can become powdery and tattered. For the most part all Bibles were covered in calf. There are examples of cloth bindings for Bibles, too. These were the poor families’ option. In late Victorian clothbound Bibles there is a likelihood of poor paper, too.

Hide glue was used to along with linen thread to bind the Bibles. Hide glue is only good for about a hundred years before it becomes brittle. Hide glue also can be acidic. It is not unusual to see the spine of the Bible parting from the glue having shrunk and separated from the paper. Because of the shear weight of the Family Bible, all these materials bound together properly can last for centuries, if one fails the whole Bible will soon fall apart.

With the ingredients of leather, cotton, hide glue and linen we see in its composition that this is a rather organic system. In some ways it is miraculous they don’t get eaten by vermin and pets! Take any of these materials and nail them to an outside post and you’ll witness a rather quick degradation to dust! So then, what can we do to prolong these precious heirlooms?

  • Never put a Bible in the basement, garage or attic.
  • Never put a Bible upright without lateral support.
  • Never leave a Bible opened for prolonged periods.
  • Never let sunlight or harsh lighting contact the Bible
  • Never keep a Bible in either a humid or extremely dry environment.
  • Never keep a Bible in an extremely warm environment.
  • Do keep a Bible at room temperature 68 to 72 degrees.
  • Do store a Bible flat but make sure it’s kept to its form not canted.
  • Do maintain humidity as close to 50% as possible.
  • Do contain the Bible in an archival box.
  • Do store the Bible near bottom of the closet. (Not the floor (flood) not on top (fire))
  • Do keep the Bible Record updated with a note inside front cover with family names.
  • Do choose a responsible guardian to transfer the Bible when you are ready.

Nothing lasts forever, at least in a physical form. Family Bibles after 100 years generally can use the services of a professional bookbinder. With the proper restoration and conservation, this heirloom can reasonably last another 100 years. Use caution in selecting a good conservator and your family will enjoy and treasure your Family Bible for many more generations.

Personal Bible Study – 3 Tips for a Deeper Understanding of Scripture

Many people study their Bibles without much of a structured plan. Reading the Bible simply for enjoyment can bring a blessing, but having a structured study plan can bring deeper understanding. Deeper understanding of Scripture in turn can enhance one’s Spiritual walk and act as a doorway to a closure personal relationship with God. These tips will bring rewards both to those new to Bible study and old hands alike. Some of the ideas we will discuss may seem quite simple or obvious, but you would be surprised at how many who count themselves as believers don’t take advantage of these simple tools. Please don’t make the mistake of underestimating the strength of simplicity.

Tip 1 Read your Bible completely from cover to cover.
This sounds like the proverbial no-brainer. You would likely be surprised though at how many who claim to believe the Bible have never taken this crucial first step. Sometimes people will claim to have read the Bible, but in actuality all they have done for years is dip in at random places. This practice is fine for inspiration, comfort or enjoyment but will be found lacking if one really wants to have an understanding of what the Scripture actually says or the coherent story it presents. What book or story do we ever read in this piecemeal fashion? When reading other stories don’t we do so from beginning to end? You needn’t be too overwhelmed by the size of the task. Just read some amount each day, picking up each time from where you last left off. The trick is consistency or reading some each day and/or at regular intervals. This should be done as a crucial first step to gain an understanding of the Bible, even before other types of Bible study if possible. Why not start today? If not now, when?

Tip 2 Look up words in a concordance.
Concordances can be found in both new and used bookstores. There are concordances that can be accessed and used for free on the World Wide Web by anyone with access to a computer and an Internet connection. A concordance is a dictionary of sorts. Modern Bibles are translated from older texts which were originally written in other languages. Often the translator had no direct translation for some words so they just “did their best”. Or at times they may have translated a word from the original inconsistently in English. For example did you know that the word ‘Nation’ and the word ‘Gentile’ have the same meaning in the original texts? The translator just made a choice as to when to render it in these two different manners. Sometimes one English word used in different places in Scripture can actually refer to multiple words in the original language. By making use of a concordance one can look up words from verses, trace them back to the original language and discover the meaning of that word in the original language. I have been quite surprised at times to find the original meaning of words the definitions of which I mistakenly thought were obvious in English. Digging into the deeper meanings of words can in turn give deeper understanding to your Bible readings. Can you imagine somebody learning English and never being exposed to a dictionary? Why are we never encouraged to use a similar tool for Bible study?

Tip 3 Follow a keyword from a concordance to all associated Bible verses
Once you find a word in a Bible verse that you want to study and go to look it up in your concordance, you will find a list of verses that have the same word in them. Say for example you want to do a study to gain a deeper understand of the concept of ‘Grace’. When you look it up in your concordance there will be a listing of all the Bible verses that use the word ‘grace’. If you look up each verse and read it in context you will gain a deeper understanding of the Bible’s message and use of the word. This practice may give you a deeper and different understanding of the verse you are currently reading.

These tips form the bare minimum tools and practices I suggest to Bible students. They are simple and easy for anyone to put into practice. I can almost guarantee they will produce a deeper understanding of Scripture and be more practical and useful as study tools than the all too common “hunt and peck/piecemeal” approach that most are putting to use. Be blessed and happy studies.